Microsoft now has a patent on making a thinner laptop keyboard. The company may have answer to the problems with the Apple’s thin laptop butterfly keyboards which had many problems. However, we’ve yet to see Microsoft apply this technology in one of their laptops.

According to the Microsoft patent on the World Intellectual Property Organization, Microsoft currently has the designs to make a thin keyboard. The patent explains that there’s a trend for thinner keyboards and Microsoft has figured out a way to make thin keyboards.

Unlike Apple’s keyboard, Microsoft’s thin keyboard will be fortified with two layers of fabric and support structures. These would allow the keyboard to be strong while being as thin as possible for laptop use.

As of now, Microsoft has yet to push out this thin keyboard in any of their devices soon. However, Microsoft will have the Surface event this coming fall which could potentially have some reveals of the device that could have this technology.

On the other end, Apple was successful in pushing out a sleek Mac laptops with the butterfly keyboards. However, some owners noticed that the keyboard was actually fragile and prone to typing issues once it gathers dust after long use. Once dust gets in the keyboard’s insides, the keys start to show problems like double inputs on a single press.

Apple has since apologized for the issues and offered a repair program which would help resolve the butterfly keyboard issues. However, some users would still find the issue to return.

For now, those interested to see Microsoft’s technology at work will have to wait until the new laptop gets release. As of late, Microsoft has also been bolstering its efforts and focusing its resources toward cloud storage services. While Amazon and Google have long been at the top of this industry, Microsoft is planning to go in with the Azure.

With this cloud services focus it’s highly possible that Microsoft may not have this technology ready for any laptop soon.

Microsoft Logo block Pictured: The Microsoft logo is pictured during the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting in Bellevue, Washington on November 29, 2017. Photo: AFP/Getty Images/Jason Redmond